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Dec. 4, 2021:  Video of Sickle Cell Disease Webinar

Host Chapters: (Maryland): Prince George's County Chapter, Anne Arundel County Chapter, Baltimore Metropolitan Chapter, (California): Los Angeles Chapter, Central Valley Chapter, Oakland/Bay Area Chapter, San Francisco Chapter, and Silicon Valley Chapter.


NATIONAL RESOLUTION ISSUED BY NC100BW ON SICKLE CELL DISEASE

WHEREAS, the National Coalition of 100 Black Women recognizes that Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) affects millions of people throughout the world and particularly affects those who are of Sub-Saharan African decent, and other people of color from Spanish-speaking and Mediterranean decent; and 

WHEREAS, SDC occurs once out of every 365 African American Births, while 1 out of 13 Black or African Americans are born with the sickle cell trait (SCT); and 

WHEREAS, people who are affected by SCD have less access to quality and comprehensive care than other diseases that are genetic such as hemophilia and cystic fibrosis with a majority of SCD patients being Medicaid recipients. Less than 70% of doctors accept new Medicaid patients; and 

WHEREAS, these aforementioned health disparities cause SCD patients to receive longer wait times for treatment with medical professionals doubting the severity of pain level as well as mislabeling SCD patients as drug seekers; and 

WHEREAS, resources must be made equitably available to maintain good health both physically and mentally; and 

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the members of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Inc. will make a commitment to advocate and educate the community on treatment and resources available for SCD patients to address the disparities identified; and 

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that each NCBW chapter implements this action as it is appropriate to the resources of its local chapter and the needs of its members of the community.

References: CDC Data & Statistics on Sickle Cell Disease Dec. 16, 2020 CDC Foundation Sickle Cell Disease Health Disparities Retrieved: August 17, 2021. 

Approved by the NCBW National Health Awareness Committee.